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Deployment

Predeployment Guide | Important Info & Guides

  • Important Information

  • The Importance of a Power of Attorney

  • The Importance of a Will

  • Family Member Care Plan

  • Base Support Agencies and Programs

  • Financial Matters

  • The Family Wheels

  • Pre-separation Checklist

  • Time Conversion Chart



  • Important Information


    Sponsor's Squadron:


    Duty Section:


    Phone Number:


    OIC/NCOIC Name:


    Orderly Room Phone #:


    Commander's Name & Phone #:


    First Sergeant's Name & Phone #:


    Sponsor's TDY location (if releasable):



    Sponsor's TDY Address:



    Commercial & DSN Phone # for Spouse's TDY location (if available):


    Names and Numbers of Friends at Home Base:






    Persons to Contact in Case of Emergency at (i.e., relatives). Names, Phone #:






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  • The Importance of a Power of Attorney


    The power of attorney is a legal instrument that deserves your serious consideration. In important personal matters, it may often be necessary for your spouse, a parent, or another competent person to act for you in your behalf, and a power of attorney becomes an essential document.

    Most attorneys and legal assistance officers are in a position to furnish you with a general power of attorney which covers most contingencies. This may very well satisfy your personal needs. Otherwise, you may prefer to have a more specific power of attorney drawn by your attorney or your legal assistance officer.

    If a power of attorney is to be executed in connection with life insurance policies, it is not always feasible to employ a standard form. Insurance contracts contain multiple features and any power of attorney given in connection with them should be tailored to fit the specific contract. Check with your legal office for guidance.

    One of the most important and least known powers of attorney are the ones given to a baby sitter. If you have children and they become ill while you're away, no doctor, on or off base, can treat the child unless it is an emergency. In other words, all the doctors can do is keep your child alive until you can be located. A power of attorney gives the baby sitter legal right to seek medical assistance for your child. A copy of this power of attorney should also be kept with the child's medical records.

    In any event, before you execute a power of attorney, be sure you understand exactly what you want your attorney-in-fact to do in your place. For example, you may want to limit the duration of the instrument to a period of time you expect to be in the military service or overseas.

    It is important for you to periodically review your existing power of attorney(s). Your changing needs may necessitate the revision of an existing power of attorney, ensuring it accomplishes exactly what you need done and nothing else. Remember, it is a good habit to periodically review ALL of your legal instruments (power of attorney, will, etc.) A little time spent reviewing and revising may save you a great deal of trouble later.

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  • The Importance of a Will


    Should you die without a Will, the state in which you live will make one for you. However, the Will made for you by law is most rigid and arbitrary in its distribution of your estate after your death. You will not have any say as to disposition of your assets. Therefore, regardless of the size, nature or extent of your estate, everyone should have a skillfully prepared Will which carries out your wishes and desires.

    Your Will, when properly and accurately drawn, allows you to distribute your estate in almost any manner you desire and permits you to nominate the person of your choice to carry out your mandates at a minimum of expense to the estate. You can direct the period of time over which your estate will be distributed and all the terms and conditions for said distribution. You can appoint other fiduciaries such as guardians, trustees, and others to administer and tend to the needs of minor children in accordance with your wishes and desires and not that of creditors or distant relatives or some stranger to your loved ones. A Will provides a valuable link in the chain of title for all real property (houses, lots, farms, etc.).

    No single Will form exists that can be used in all parts of the United States. In addition, it is important to remember that the desires and needs of individuals can differ. See a lawyer of your own choice for the preparation of your Will and that of your spouse. If you need assistance, visit your base legal office.

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  • Family Member Care Plan


    FAMILY MEMBER CARE PLAN FOR MILITARY MARRIED TO MILITARY AND THE SINGLE- PARENT

    All military members married to military members and single-parent military members with minor children must have a Family Member Care Certification or Child Care Plan. The Family Care Plan is a working plan. It helps provide guidance for care givers during mobilization. It helps guardians and others with care for family member's financial, legal, and medical needs. Family care plans alleviate some of the pressures involved in deployment, mobilization, training, etc. The plans allow you to concentrate on your mission and be more productive. Family Care Plans include information as to how you want family business conducted in your absence. Also, included in this plan are forms, instructions for care, legal authorizations, and names, addresses, and telephone numbers of people involved in the Family Care Plan. With no time to prepare a Family Care Plan in the midst of departure, it is essential to have a plan before the mobilization or TDY. Check with your orderly room and Airman & Family Readiness Center for assistance in developing your plan. Review AFI 36-2908 for further information.

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  • Base Support Agencies and Programs


    Knowing who to call when you have problems helps to keep the difficulty from seeming like a catastrophe.

    AMERICAN RED CROSS

    Location:


    Phone #:


    Services Provided:
    • Emergency communications
    • Financial assistance for emergency leave, and other special circumstances on a case by case basis
    • Information and referral
    • CPR and First Aid courses
    CHAMPUS / TRICARE

    Location:


    Phone #:


    Services Provided:
    • Advice on filling out claim forms and available civilian medical care.
    • Care authorization
    • Nonavailability statements
    CHAPEL

    Location:


    Phone #:


    Services Provided:
    • Rites: Baptism, Holy Communion, weddings, funerals and other sacraments and rites, as required in individual faiths.
    • Counseling: For religious, family, individual, interpersonal, marriage, morale, and premarital counseling.
    • Education: Religious education program, growth seminars, bible study groups, couples communication, family enrichment, and marriage encounters.
    • Fellowship: Diverse social activities, youth groups, men's and women's organizations and prayer groups.
    EXCEPTIONAL FAMILY MEMBER PROGRAM (EFMP)

    Location:


    Phone #:


    Services Provided:
    • Counseling
    • Referral
    • Special assignment consideration
    • Special medical or educational help
    • Referral for financial help
    • Respite Care
    • AF Form 1466 Dependent Relocation Clearances
    FAMILY ADVOCACY PROGRAM

    Location:


    Phone #:


    Services Provided:
    • Outreach & education on life skills
    • Exceptional Family Member Program
    • Family maltreatment counseling & referral
    • First Time Parents Program
    • Anger Management Classes
    MENTAL HEALTH

    Location:


    Phone #:


    Services Provided:
    • SART (Substance Abuse Reorientation and Treatment)
    • Individual, group, family, marital therapy
    • Tobacco cessation program with nicotine replacement therapy
    • Assertiveness training
    • Stress management
    • Biofeedback/relaxation therapy
    FAMILY SERVICES

    Location:


    Phone #:


    Services Provided:
    • Loan closet (with kitchen utensils, futons, playpens, strollers, high chairs, car seats, irons, and ironing boards).
    • Maintains a list of base brochures on military installations in the US and overseas.
    Airman & Family Readiness Center

    Location:


    Phone #:


    Services Provided:
    • Air Force Aid Society financial assistance
    • Information and referral services
    • Transition assistance
    • Special needs assessment
    • Employment Assistance Program
    • Financial management skills assistance and training
    • Support during family separation due to TDY or remote assignment
    • Relocation assistance
    • Volunteer Resources Program
    • Family Enrichment
    • Support Groups
    SOCIAL ACTIONS

    Location:


    Phone #:


    Services Provided:
    • Equal opportunity and treatment counseling.
    • Assist in filing EOT complaints (race, color, religion, national origin, ethnic group, age, or sex).
    • Non-EOT Referrals.
    • Education/awareness programs (Human Relations).
    • Wing and unit human relations climate assessment.
    • Speakers available for units and groups on a variety of human relations topics such as communication, conflict resolution and diversity management.
    YOUTH CENTER

    Location:


    Phone #:


    Services Provided:
    • Summer camps
    • Before and after school programs
    • Recreational opportunities
    • Instructional opportunities
    • Cultural opportunities
    • Educational opportunities
    • Team and individual sport
    • At-risk Youth programs
    • Youth Transition programs
    CHILD DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

    Location:


    Phone #:


    Services Provided:
    • Full time and hourly care
    • Enrichment Programs
    • FDC program
    • Resource and Referral Program
    • Give parents a break
    • AFAS Child Care Program for Volunteers
    • Special needs training
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  • Financial Matters


    Many problems spouses have during family separations are money related.

    BILLS

    Designate one person to pay the bills regularly each month. The spouse who is home on a more regular basis usually accepts this responsibility. Although both spouses should be aware of their financial picture, switching back and forth may lead to confusion.

    SPENDING PLAN

    1. Make a complete inventory of your monthly financial obligations (see budget work sheet). Many agencies can assist you in organizing a spending plan for your family including the FSC Financial Management Program, some financial institutions and Consumer Credit Counseling agencies. Basically, you need to estimate the amount of money coming in, your "fixed" expenses (housing, utilities, etc.), and the management of the remaining income (savings, emergencies, major purchases, recreation, etc.).


    2. Both spouses need to work out a spending plan together. This point cannot be stressed enough since financial difficulty is one of the most common problems military families experience during separation.
    SPECIAL BUDGET CONSIDERATIONS

    1. Cost of long distance phone calls between the spouses and relatives and friends.


    2. Non-reimbursable travel expenses of the service member as well as changes in pay entitlement.


    3. It is necessary to make allowances in the spending plan to cover these costs or make an agreement not to indulge in these extras and stick to the plan.
    ALLOTMENT

    1. An allotment is a specified amount of money designated by Air Force members which is deducted from paychecks and sent to a designated individual or institution on or about the first of each month.


    2. Setting up an allotment ensures that your family receives funds on a regular basis to operate the household whether or not you are home. Plan ahead. It can take several months for the allotment procedure to begin.
    TWO CHECKING ACCOUNTS

    1. Most couples find it helpful to maintain two checking accounts--one for monthly household expenses and one for the service member while away from home. This eliminates the problem of some deposits and withdrawals not being recorded, as a result of two people in two different places trying to operate out of one checkbook.


    2. If you decide to operate with one checking account, make sure you work out procedures for maintaining a "Master" check register up to date at all times to avoid confusion and possible problems.
    INCOME TAX

    If the family will be separated when taxes are due, decide in advance how income taxes will be filed and who will do it. If you prefer to calculate the taxes while you are away, take into consideration the time it will take to mail tax forms back and forth. Make several copies of all forms that are mailed in case they are lost. Another option is to apply to the Internal Revenue Service for an extension on the filing date. Remember, free tax assistance is available from the base Volunteer Income Tax Assistance office and you should call the legal office if you have any questions.

    CASH FLOW WORKSHEET #1: MONTHLY INCOME

    TYPE OF INCOME ESTIMATED ACTUAL
    BASIC PAY    
    QUARTERS ALLOWANCE (BAQ)    
    SUBSISTENCE ALLOWANCE (BAS)    
    CLOTHING ALLOWANCE    
    VARIABLE HOUSING ALLOWANCE (VHA)    
    SPECIAL PAY (FLIGHT, PRO, ETC.)    
    MEMBER'S OFF DUTY PAY (NET)    
    SPOUSE'S EARNINGS (NET)    
    CHILD SUPPORT (RECEIVED)    
    INTEREST/DIVIDENDS    
    OTHER    
         
         
    TOTAL MONTHLY CASH-IN    

    CASH FLOW WORKSHEET #1: MONTHLY INCOME

    MONTHLY BUDGET ESTIMATED ACTUAL
    FIXED EXPENSES    
    SAVINGS (PAY YOURSELF FIRST)    
    SOCIAL SECURITY    
    MEDICARE    
    FEDERAL WITHHOLDING TAX (FTW)    
    STATE WITHHOLDING TAX (STW)    
    AFRH    
    SGLI    
    COMMERCIAL LIFE INSURANCE    
    DUES AND CLUB MEMBERSHIPS    
    CHILD SUPPORT/ALIMONY (PAID)    
    VEHICLE INSURANCE    
    RENT/MORTGAGE    
    VARIABLE EXPENSES    
    ELECTRICITY    
    GAS    
    WATER/SEWER    
    TRASH    
    HOUSE/YARD UPKEEP    
    TELEPHONE    
    GROCERIES    
    PERSONAL CARE ITEMS    
    SUPPLIES (CLEANING, ETC.)    
    AUTOMOBILE (GAS & OIL)    
    AUTOMOBILE MAINTENANCE/REPAIR (Routine)    
    LICENSE/TAX/INSPECTION    
    CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES    
    LAUNDRY/DRY CLEANING    
    SCHOOL COSTS (TUITION)    
    SCHOOL SUPPLIES (BOOKS, ETC)    
    CHILD DAY CARE    
    ALLOWANCES    
    BEAUTY/BARBER SHOP    
    MEDICAL/DENTAL    
    MEDICINES & DRUGS    
    GLASSES/CONTACTS    
    NEWSPAPERS/MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTIONS    
    CHARITABLE CONTRIBUTIONS    
    HOBBIES & SUPPLIES    
    FOOD    
    SNACKS    
    CABLE TV    
    RECREATION/ENTERTAINMENT    
    TOBACCO PRODUCTS    
    BEVERAGES    
    BANK SERVICE CHARGES    
    POSTAGE    
    VETERINARY COSTS/PET FOOD & CARE    
    OTHER EXPENSES:    
         
         
         
         
         
    TOTAL MONTHLY EXPENSES    

    SAVING BONDS

    Record all serial numbers of your bonds. Keep the list of numbers in a different place from where you keep the bonds. If you have bonds in different amounts, record the amount as well as the number. If you cash the bonds, record the amount of interest paid to you. That amount is required for your income tax return.

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  • The Family Wheels


    The Family Car is one of Your Most Valuable Possession While Your Spouse Is Away. Please take care of it.

    AUTOMOTIVE CHECKLIST

    1. Does the car need a tune-up?
      ( )YES
      ( )NO


    2. Mileage at last tune-up:


    3. Mileage at next scheduled tune-up?:


    4. Where should the car be taken for service:


    5. What type of gasoline does the car use?
      ( )Leaded
      ( )Unleaded
      ( )Unleaded Premium


    6. Is there water in the battery?
      ( )YES
      ( )NO


    7. Is the battery in good condition?
      ( )YES
      ( )NO


    8. What kind and size of battery should be purchased, if needed?


    9. Where should a new battery be purchased?


    10. Are the tires in good condition?
      ( )YES
      ( )NO

      - Is there at least a 1/4" tread?
      ( )YES
      ( )NO

      - Do you know how to check for tread depth?
      ( )YES
      ( )NO


    11. Will the tires last through a deployment?
      ( )YES
      ( )NO


    12. If needed, what size, type, and brand of tires should be purchased?


    13. Is there a guarantee on the present tires and is it readily accessible?
      ( )YES
      ( )NO


    14. When is the car insurance premium due?


    15. How much is it?


    16. To whom is it paid and how?


    17. Does the car have an inspection sticker and, if so, when does it expire?


    18. Where are the car's registration papers or cards?


    19. When does the registration expire?


    20. Do you need a power of attorney to register your car?


    21. Does the car need to be lubricated before the end of this assignment or deployment?
      ( )YES
      ( )NO

      - If yes, at what mileage?


    22. At what mileage should the oil be changed?


    23. What type and weight of oil is used?


    24. Where should this be done?


    25. Should the oil filter be changed?
      ( )YES
      ( )NO


    26. Should the spark plugs be changed?
      ( )YES
      ( )NO


    27. At what mileage should they be changed?


    28. What brand and type plugs should be used?


    29. Is a new air filter needed?
      ( )YES
      ( )NO


    30. When should a new air filter be installed?


    31. Can you replace the filter yourself?
      ( )YES
      ( )NO


    32. When does your base sticker expire?


    33. Are there extra car keys in the house?
      ( )YES
      ( )NO

      - If yes, where are they?
    COMMON CAR PROBLEMS

    1. Starting Difficulties:

      • If your car refuses to start, but the battery has enough power to crank the engine, you may not be using the correct starting procedures. For most cars, starting the engine when it is cold requires that you depress the gas pedal to the floor then release it. Turn on the ignition and attempt to start the car, the engine should start. If not, pump the accelerator two to three times and try again. If for some reason you have pumped the accelerator several times and you begin to smell a faint odor of gasoline, chances are you've flooded the engine. This means that there is too much gas in the engine. In this case, wait for two or three minutes, depress the accelerator all the way to the floor, hold it while cranking the engine, and the car should start. As soon as it does, release the accelerator. If it doesn't start, there may be some mechanical problem.


    2. Cold Weather Starts:

      • If the temperature has been close to freezing for several hours, your car may be hard to start. Be sure to depress the accelerator all the way to the floor twice and release it before cranking the engine. When starting, the engine will probably turn over sluggishly and slowly pick up momentum. Follow this procedure for a maximum of five times. If the engine still won't even show any sign of life, quit. Any more attempts will just kill your battery.


      • There are several other tricks for cold-weather starts. Chemical spray are available for you to spray into the air intake unit which sits on top of the engine. Before cranking, however, make sure to read the manufacturer's instructions to the letter since these sprays are highly flammable.


    3. Dead Battery:

      • A battery is considered "dead" when it no longer has enough power to turn the engine over. If there is only enough power in the battery to just slowly turn the engine, chances are that the engine is not going to start.


      • A battery that has lost its charge can be recharged by using a charger which takes household current and transforms it into the type needed in the battery. Battery chargers are almost as expensive as new batteries, but by taking the battery to a gas station, it can be recharged for only a few dollars.


      • Sometimes, because of the age of the battery or "burned out" cells within the battery, the battery will not take a charge. That is, it will go dead as soon as you remove it from the charging device. At this point, the only option left is to purchase a new battery.


      • The most common causes of battery failures are:

        • Excessive attempts to start an engine that has failed due to mechanical problems.


        • Too many starts (over a period of several weeks) and not enough driving time to recharge the battery with the alternator or generator.


        • Forgetting to turn off headlights and other electrical equipment which doesn't go off when the ignition is turned off.


        • Finally, equip your car for a "dead battery emergency" by buying a set of jumper cables. These are two lengths of cable with squeeze-type clamps at each end for transferring power from a good battery into a dead one to start the car. Once running, the engine will recharge the dead battery as explained above. Be sure to hook up the jumper cables correctly: watch polarity (+ and -). It is best to go over this procedure with someone who knows how before trying it yourself.
    IN CASE OF AN ACCIDENT

    An auto accident occurs in the United States every 90 seconds, so buckle up for safety.

    If you are involved in an accident:

    STOP IMMEDIATELY AND.....
    1. Aid any injured persons. Call a doctor. Do not move the injured person as movement may add to their injury. If necessary, call an ambulance.


    2. Call an officer of the law.


    3. Do not admit responsibility -- make no statement regarding the accident except to the police. The law requires that you give your name, address, and license number. You are not required to give any other information at the scene of the accident.


    4. DO NOT REVEAL THE EXTENT OF YOUR INSURANCE COVERAGE TO ANYONE.


    5. Take notes concerning all details of the accident. Be sure to get names and addresses of all injured persons, occupants of all cars, and other witnesses.


    6. REPORT ALL ACCIDENTS TO YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY IMMEDIATELY. Proof of financial responsibility cannot be furnished by the company to your state authorities until the company receives your accident report.
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  • Pre-separation Checklist


    1. Have you discussed your feelings on the deployment and your spouse's return?
    2. Have the children been included in discussions on where you are going, when you are coming home, why you are leaving?
    3. Have you reached an agreement on frequency of letter writing/phone calls?
    4. Do you have current family snapshots?
    5. Have you recorded your children's favorite bedtime stories/songs on cassettes?
    6. Do both the deploying member and remaining parent or guardian understand what the Airman & Family Readiness Center, Family Services, Air Force Aid Society, American Red Cross, Chaplain etc. can do for you and how to contact them?
    SECURITY

    1. Has the home been given a security check?
    2. Do all window locks work?
    3. Do the windows open or are they painted shut?
    4. Do all door locks work properly?
    5. Do you have keys for all doors or combinations for all padlocks?
    6. Does the smoke alarms function and do you know how to test them?
    7. Are all emergency numbers posted where they can easily be referred to?
    8. Is there an appropriate message on the answering machine?
      (Having a male voice sometimes discourages crank phone calls)
    9. Do you need to change your phone number to an unlisted number?
    MEDICAL

    1. Do you know and understand how to use the medical facilities, CHAMPUS and CHAMPUS Prime?
    2. Do you know who your children's pediatrician is and what his/her phone number is?
    3. Do you know your children's dentist/orthodontist and their schedule?
    FINANCIAL
    (See Financial Matters Section for More Information)

    1. Have you determined who will pay the bills?
    2. Do you have a spending plan?
    3. Do you both understand the spending plan?
    4. Does you spending plan consider the following?

      Rent/Mortgage
      Utilities
      Food
      Automobile Maintenance
      Insurance
      Loan Payments
      Emergencies
      Long Distance Phone Calls
      Postage
      Telegrams
      Travel (Leave)
      Entertainment
      Presents
      Savings

    5. Has an allotment been established?
    6. Will the allotment be in effect in time?
    7. Is there a "backup" plan if the allotment is late?
    8. Have you established two checking accounts?
    9. Have you decided upon a procedure for income taxes?
    LEGAL

    1. Do you know spouse's social security number?
    2. Have you provided for Power of Attorney?
    3. Do you have current wills?
    4. Have guardians for the children been named in the will?
    5. Does everyone who qualifies have a government identification (ID) card?
    6. Will any ID cards need renewing?
    7. If ID needs renewing, has Form DD 1172 been completed?
    8. Is military member's record of emergency data on record and current?
    9. Do you know the process for moving your household goods?
    IMPORTANT PAPERS

    Are the following important papers current and in an accessible safety deposit box?
    • Power of Attorney
    • Wills
    • Insurance Policies
    • Real Estate (Deeds, Titles, Mortgages, Leases)
    • Bank Account Numbers
    • Charge Account Numbers
    • Savings Bonds
    • Birth Certificates
    • Marriage Certificates
    • Naturalization Papers
    • Citizenship Papers
    • Family Social Security Numbers
    • Inventory of Household Goods
    • Car Title(s)
    Does each of you have the following phone numbers?
    • Police
    • Fire
    • Medical (Hospital/Doctor)
    • Service Member's Contact Number
    • Service Member's Unit in Local Area
    • Spouses in Unit/Squadron
    • Reliable Neighbors
    • Relatives
    • Children's School
    • Spouse's Workplace
    • Utilities
    • Repair Shops
    • Insurance Company
    • Airman & Family Readiness Center
    HOUSEHOLD MAINTENANCE

    1. Do you know who to call if something breaks?
    2. Do you know how to operate the furnace?
    3. Does the furnace have clean filters?
    4. Does the furnace need periodic supplies of oil/gas?
    5. Is the hot water heater operating properly?
    6. Any pipes or faucets leaking?
    7. Toilets operate correctly?
    8. All drains operate correctly?
    9. Are the following appliances operating correctly?

      Stove
      Refrigerator
      Freezer
      Dishwasher
      Clothes Washer
      Clothes Dryer
      Television
      Air Conditioner


    10. Does everyone know where the fuse box is?
    11. Are the switches of the fuse box labeled?
    12. Are there extra fuses?
    13. Is there adequate outside lighting?
    14. Is there a list of repair persons?
    15. Are there tools in the house?
    16. Is the lawn mower tuned?
    17. Is there an adequate amount of fire wood?
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  • Time Conversion Chart


    KOREA JAPAN HAWA PST MST CST EST CMT GRMNY IRAQ THAIL VIET
    0100 0100 0600 0800 0900 1000 1100 1600 1700 1900 2300 2400
    0200 0200 0700 0900 1000 1100 1200 1700 1800 2000 2400 0100
    0300 0300 0800 1000 1100 1200 1300 1800 1900 2100 0100 0200
    0400 0400 0900 1100 1200 1300 1400 1900 2000 2200 0200 0300
    0500 0500 1000 1200 1300 1400 1500 2000 2100 2300 0300 0400
    0600 0600 1100 1300 1400 1500 1600 2100 2200 2400 0400 0500
    0700 0700 1200 1400 1500 1600 1700 2200 2300 0100 0500 0600
    0800 0800 1300 1500 1600 1700 1800 2300 2400 0200 0600 0700
    0900 0900 1400 1600 1700 1800 1900 2400 0100 0300 0700 0800
    1000 1000 1500 1700 1800 1900 2000 0100 0200 0400 0800 0900
    1100 1100 1600 1800 1900 2000 2100 0200 0300 0500 0900 1000
    1200 1200 1700 1900 2000 2100 2200 0300 0400 0600 1000 1100
    1300 1300 1800 2000 2100 2200 2300 0400 0500 0700 1100 1200
    1400 1400 1900 2100 2200 2300 2400 0500 0600 0800 1200 1300
    1500 1500 2000 2200 2300 2400 0100 0600 0700 0900 1300 1400
    1600 1600 2100 2300 2400 0100 0200 0700 0800 1000 1400 1500
    1700 1700 2200 2400 0100 0200 0300 0800 0900 1100 1500 1600
    1800 1800 2300 0100 0200 0300 0400 0900 1000 1200 1600 1700
    1900 1900 2400 0200 0300 0400 0500 1000 1100 1300 1700 1800
    2000 2000 0100 0300 0400 0500 0600 1100 1200 1400 1800 1900
    2100 2100 0200 0400 0500 0600 0700 1200 1300 1500 1900 2000
    2200 2200 0300 0500 0600 0700 0800 1300 1400 1600 2000 2100
    2300 2300 0400 0600 0700 0800 0900 1400 1500 1700 2100 2200
    2400 2400 0500 0700 0800 0900 1000 1500 1600 1800 2200 2300

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