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You care about parenting and want your children to grow into healthy, cooperative, productive adults. You know they need discipline—but what style is right for you? You want them to succeed, but how do you encourage success without damaging their lifelong sense of worth? Most of all, how do you build the courage, responsibility, respect and other qualities of character that will make you both proud?

The Afterschool Alliance is a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness of the importance of afterschool programs and advocating for quality, affordable programs for all children. It is supported by a group of public, private and nonprofit organizations that share the Alliance's vision of ensuring that all children have access to afterschool programs by 2010.

When your child is disabled, whether because of the way they were born or after an accident or injury, you instantly turn from simply a parent to an advocate. It's your job to give your child the best possible start in life, embracing the different abilities so your child can thrive. However, sometimes this is difficult to do in a traditional home layout. If your child, for example, is in a wheelchair, and you have narrow hallways, then getting around your home may be difficult, if not impossible. Home modifications can help you make your home into a place where your child is safe, comfortable and thriving. At HomeCity, we want to help you with the process of modifying your home. Here are some tips to make it a little easier.

Provides articles, interviews, book reviews, and activities for parents leading creative lives.

A national network of Land Grant university faculty and county Extension educators working to support community based educational programs for children, youth, parents and families. Contains practical research-based information.

Designed to help fathers who have to be away from their children to maintain and strengthen the relationships they have with their children while they are away.

If you are looking for information to promote an inclusive workforce and increase employment opportunities for people with disabilities, please visit the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) homepage. To find additional disability information, we recommend using publicly available search engines and visiting the following links.

When disaster strikes, our first instinct is to check in with our loved ones and make sure they’re okay. But if your loved one is a senior or has a disability, you can’t afford to wait to “check in” — timing is everything during an emergency, and you need to buy them as much time as possible to react independently. You should create an emergency preparedness guide to keep them safe and accessible even as a crisis is unfolding.

Has craft ideas, a sharing board, and articles that relate to early childhood issues.

Written for the fathers. Sections on book reviews; importance of fathers; health; joy of fathering; single fathers; fathers and sons; fathers and daughters; custody and divorce; child support; second wives; and fathering news.

Disability can be a lifelong condition that shapes your identity from birth, or something that happens in the blink of an eye – an injury or diagnosis that abruptly derails life as you know it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that one in five American adults lives with a disability, making the disabled the single largest minority group in the U.S.

It’s estimated that there are 252,000 construction sites across the nation on any given day. Just picture them. Towering apartment buildings climbing toward the sky. Highways being reconstructed. Homes being expanded, and shimmering office buildings being renovated along busy city streets. These impressive projects bring us safer, newer, and better places to live and work, yet they are some of the most dangerous areas we encounter on any given day.

When it comes to identifying vulnerable populations in our community, some of the more overlooked groups are the elderly and disabled. Many people consider the poor or the young to be venerable, but those who are elderly and those who are struggling with physical or cognitive disabilities are also quite vulnerable. Yet the laws surrounding the elderly and disabled in our population are often poorly understood. This is unfortunate, because these two groups of people make up a significant part of our population, and most likely someone you are close to could fall into one of these categories.

National Parent Teacher Association (PTA) reminds our country of its obligations to children and provides parents and families with a powerful voice to speak on behalf of every child while providing the best tools for parents to help their children be successful students.

This site offers many useful parenting links for support groups. These include ADD, bipolar, and support information for special needs children.

Contains resources, articles and information on parenting premature babies.

Inform yourself about curriculum strategies and classroom management for students with different learning needs. We have resources on everything you need to know about teaching special needs students effectively. You'll find information for teaching students with ADHD, Autism, Asperger's, Giftedness, and Handicaps. We'll help you figure out ways to create an inclusive classroom, adapt and supplement your classroom materials, make assessment accommodations, and provide you with other useful tips.

Some senior adults need a bit of help and care, but when a senior has a special need, the level of care increases significantly. With the right resources, you can create a plan of care that will ensure your loved one’s needs – from healthcare through financial – are well met throughout their retirement years.

Provides parenting advice, newsletter, product recalls and much more.

It’s an old adage, but it’s true: Home is where the heart is. That’s why, according to the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), nearly 90 percent of seniors say they want to age in their own home. It’s also the reason that adults with disabilities would rather make accommodations to their own home in order to stay there after experiencing a life-changing disability, than move into a facility that can better accommodate their immediate needs.

 
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